Category: NEWS & EVENTS


DON’T: Aim for significance. DO: Aim for precision

[From the recent working paper, “The statistical significance filter leads to overoptimistic expectations of replicability” by Vasishth, Mertzen, Jäger, and Gelman posted at PsyArXiv Preprints] “…when power is low, using significance to decide whether to publish a result leads to a proliferation of exaggerated…

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Should Science Do More Replications? It Depends

[From the recent working paper, “The Costs and Benefits of Replication Studies” by Coles, Tiokhin, Scheel, Isager, and Lakens, posted at psyarxiv.com/c8akj] “The debate about whether replication studies should become mainstream is essentially driven by disagreements about their costs and benefits,…

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National Academies of Science-Funded Committee on Research Reproducibility Holds First Meeting

[From the article “National Academies Launches Study of Research Reproducibility and Replicability” by Will Thomas, posted at FYI: Science Policy News from AIP (American Institute of Physics)] “On Dec. 12 and 13, the National Academies convened the first meeting of…

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Another Economics Journal To Publish Replication Studies

[From the article “Replication Studies” by David McMillan, Senior Editor of the journal Cogent Economics & Finance] “Cogent Economics & Finance recognises the importance of replication studies. As an indicator of this importance, we now welcome research papers that focus…

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More Evidence on How Control Variables Affect Statistical Significance

[From the working paper “Achieving Statistical Significance with Covariates and without Transparency” by Gabriel Lenz and Alexander Sanz] “An important yet understudied area of researcher discretion is the use of covariates in statistical models. Researchers choose which covariates to include in…

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IN THE NEWS: Wired (December 29, 2017)

[From the article “The Replication Crisis in Science” by Shravan Vasishth at wired.com] “There have been two distinct responses to the replication crisis – by instituting measures like registered reports and by making data openly available. But another group continues to remain in…

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Reproducibility Making Progress at Science

[From the article, “Progress in Reproducibility” by Jeremy Berg, Editor-in-Chief  Science Journals, published in the 5 January 2018 issue of Science] “Over the past year, we have retracted three papers previously published in Science. The circumstances of these retractions highlight some…

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Not Everybody Thinks the Emphasis on Reproducibility is a Good Thing

[From the article “Reproducible research: a minority opinion” by Chris Drummond, published in the Journal of Experimental & Theoretical Artificial Intelligence.] “Reproducible research, a growing movement within many scientific fields, including machine learning, would require the code, used to generate…

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Progress in Publishing Negative Results?

[From the working paper, “Publication Bias and Editorial Statement on Negative Findings” by Cristina Blanco-Perez and Abel Brodeur] “In February 2015, the editors of eight health economics journals sent out an editorial statement which aims to reduce the incentives to…

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HARKing is Bad, But Which Kind of HARKing is Worse?

[From the article “HARKing: How Badly Can Cherry-Picking and Question Trolling Produce Bias in Published Results?” by Kevin Murphy and Herman Aguinis, published in the Journal of Business and Psychology.]  “The practice of hypothesizing after results are known (HARKing) has…

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