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SCHÖNBRODT: Learn to p-Hack Like the Pros!

(NOTE: This ironic blog post was originally published on http://www.nicebread.de/introducing-p-hacker/)  My Dear Fellow Scientists! “If you torture the data long enough, it will confess.” This aphorism, attributed to Ronald Coase, sometimes has been used in a dis-respective manner, as if…

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Don’t Have Time To Do a Replication? Have You Considered p-Curves?

So another study finds that X affects Y, and you are a sufficiently cynical TRN reader that you wonder if the authors have p-hacked their way to get their result.  Don’t have time (or the incentive) to do a replication?  You…

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John Oliver and Last Week Tonight on Replications and Scientific Reliability

How does one know when replication has hit the big time?  When JOHN OLIVER and LAST WEEK TONIGHT do an entire episode on it.  For readers of TRN, much of what he talks about will be familiar.  Just a lot funnier.  Check…

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IN THE NEWS: The Economist (21 January 2016)

(FROM THE ARTICLE “Are Results in Top Journals To Be Trusted?”)  A paper recently published in the American Economic Journal, entitled “Star Wars: The Empirics Strike Back”, “analyses 50,000 tests published between 2005 and 2011 in three top American journals. It finds that the…

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REBLOG: The Reformation: Can Social Scientists Save Themselves?

We recently came across this article in the May/June 2014 issue of Pacific Standard magazine.  Okay.  It’s not “new”, but it provides an excellent historical overview of some of the issues associated with reproducibility of social science research.  WARNING: It…

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On p-Hacking, Retractions, and the Difficult Enterprise of Science

This article in FiveThirtyEighty.com is a great read for lots of reasons.  The leitmotiv is that while science has its share of fraudsters and academic scammers, the underlying problem is that the scientific enterprise is inherently very, very difficult.  To…

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