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IN THE NEWS: FiveThirtyEight (December 6, 2018)

[From the article “Psychology’s Replication Crisis Has Made The Field Better” by Christie Aschwanden, published at FiveThirtyEight] “The replication crisis arose from a series of events that began around 2011, the year that social scientists Uri Simonsohn, Leif Nelson and…

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Battle of the p-Hackers: The HARKer Versus The Accumulator

[From the blog, “Gazing into the Abyss of P-Hacking: HARKing vs. Optional Stopping” by Angelika Stefan and Felix Schönbrodt, posted at Felix Schönbrodt’s website at http://www.nicebread.de%5D “Now, what does a researcher do when confronted with messy, non-significant results? According to several…

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Tired of Candy Crush? Try the New and Improved p-Hacker App!

[From Felix Schönbrodt’s Twitter account, @nicebread303] “The p-hacker app just UNLOCKED the most requested PRO FEATURE: Subgroup analyses!!!” “Check if you can find the effect for, say, young males. This is soo theoretically interesting. Now you can get the p-hacking…

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IN THE NEWS: Mother Jones (September 25, 2018)

[From the article, “This Cornell Food Researcher Has Had 13 Papers Retracted. How Were They Published in the First Place?” by Kiera Butler, published in Mother Jones] “In 2015, I wrote a profile of Brian Wansink, a Cornell University behavioral science researcher who…

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M Is For Pizza

[From the blog ““Tweeking”: The big problem is not where you think it is” by Andrew Gelman, posted at Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science] “In her recent article about pizzagate, Stephanie Lee included this hilarious email from Brian Wansink, the…

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An Economist’s Journey Into the Replication Crisis

[From the blog “Why We Cannot Trust the Published Empirical Record in Economics and How to Make Things Better” by Sylvain Chabé-Ferret, posted at the blogsite An Economist’s Journey] “A strain of recent results is casting doubt on the soundness of the published empirical results in economics. Economics is…

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DID, IV, RCT, and RDD: Which Method Is Most Prone to Selective Publication and p-Hacking?

[From the working paper, “Methods Matter: P-Hacking and Causal Inference in Economics” by Abel Brodeur, Nikolai Cook, and Anthony Heyes] “…Applying multiple methods to 13,440 hypothesis tests reported in 25 top economics journals in 2015, we show that selective publication and p-hacking is…

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Things Aren’t Looking That Great in Ecology and Evolution Either

[From a recent working paper entitled “Questionable Research Practices in Ecology and Evolution” by Hannah Fraser, Tim Parker, Shinichi Nakagawa, Ashley Barnett, and Fiona Fidler] “We surveyed 807 researchers (494 ecologists and 313 evolutionary biologists) about their use of Questionable…

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IN THE NEWS: Buzzfeed (February 26, 2018)

[From the article, “Sliced and Diced: The Inside Story of How an Ivy League Food Scientist Turned Shoddy Data into Viral Studies” by Stephanie M. Lee in Buzzfeed] “Brian Wansink won fame, funding, and influence for his science-backed advice on…

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BLANCO-PEREZ & BRODEUR: Progress in Publishing Negative Results?

[From the working paper, “Publication Bias and Editorial Statement on Negative Findings” by Cristina Blanco-Perez and Abel Brodeur] Prior research points out that there is a selection bias in favor of positive results by editors and referees. In other words,…

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