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This is Literally a Big Deal

[From the article “Groundbreaking deal makes large number of German studies free to public” by Kai Kupferschmidt, published in Science] “Three years ago, a group of German libraries, universities, and research institutes teamed up to force the three largest scientific…

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Update on the Journal of Development Economics’ Pilot on Pre-Results Review

[From the blog by David McKenzie, “A few catch-up links”, posted at Development Impact] “At the BITSS conference, Andrew Foster … gave an update of the JDE’s pilot of registered reports/pre-results review. Some points he noted:” – “They see this process…

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GOODMAN: Hold the Bus!

A recent news piece in Nature reported in glowing terms on the “first analysis of ‘pre-registered’ studies”, stating that “[pre-registration] seems to work as intended: to reduce publication bias for positive results.” There are reasons to be somewhat dubious about…

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Oh No! Not Again!

[From the article “Push button replication: Is impact evaluation evidence for international development verifiable?” by Benjamin Wood, Rui Müller, and Annette Brown, published in PLoS ONE] “…We drew a sample of articles from the ten journals that published the most…

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IN THE NEWS: FiveThirtyEight (December 6, 2018)

[From the article “Psychology’s Replication Crisis Has Made The Field Better” by Christie Aschwanden, published at FiveThirtyEight] “The replication crisis arose from a series of events that began around 2011, the year that social scientists Uri Simonsohn, Leif Nelson and…

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Registered Reports Are Not Optimal?

[From the working paper, “Which findings should be published?” by Alexander Frankel and Maximilian Kasy] “There have been calls for reforms in the direction of non-selective publication. One proposal is to promote statistical practices that de-emphasize statistical significance … Another…

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REED: An Update on the Progress of Replications in Economics

[This post is based on a presentation by Bob Reed at the Workshop on Reproducibility and Integrity in Scientific Research, held at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand, on October 26, 2018] In 2015, Duvendack, Palmer-Jones, and Reed (DPJ&R) published…

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VLAEMINCK & PODKRAJAC: Do Economics Journals Enforce Their Data Policies?

In the past, the findings of numerous replication studies in economics have raised serious concerns regarding the credibility and reliability of published applied economic research. Literature suggests several explanations for these findings: Beyond missing incentives and rewards for the disclosure…

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MUELLER-LANGER et al.: Replication in Economics

[This blog is based on the article “ Replication studies in economics—How many and which papers are chosen for replication, and why?” by Frank Mueller-Langer, Benedikt Fecher, Dietmar Harhoff, and Gert Wagner, published in the journal Research Policy] Academia is…

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Journal Says, If We Publish the Article, We’ll Publish the Replication

[From the blog “Accountable replications at Royal Society Open Science: A model for scientific publishing” by Sanjay Srivastava, published at the blogsite, The Hardest Science] “I was excited to read this morning that the journal Royal Society Open Science has announced a new replication policy…

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