Archives


A Primer on Pre-Registration

[From the article “The preregistration revolution” by Brian Nosek, Charles Ebersole, Alexander DeHaven, and David Mellor, published in PNAS] “Progress in science relies in part on generating hypotheses with existing observations and testing hypotheses with new observations. This distinction between postdiction and prediction…

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Pre-registration. From clinical trials. To psychology. Next, the world?

[From the article “More and more scientists are preregistering their studies. Should you?” by Kai Kupferschmidt, published in Science] “…Preregistration, in its simplest form, is a one-page document answering basic questions such as: What question will be studied? What is the hypothesis?…

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Big New Replication Study in Nature! Read All About It!

[From the abstract of the article “Evaluating the replicability of social science experiments in Nature and Science between 2010 and 2015″, published in Nature Human Behaviour by Colin Camerer et al.] “Being able to replicate scientific findings is crucial for scientific progress. We replicate 21 systematically…

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IN THE NEWS: NY Times (July 16, 2018)

[From the article “Psychology Itself Is Under Scrutiny” by Benedict Carey, published in the NY Times]  “The urge to pull down statues extends well beyond the public squares of nations in turmoil. Lately it has been stirring the air in…

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Postdiction, Prediction, and Preregistration

[From the article, “The preregistration revolution” by Brian Nosek, Charles Ebersole, Alexander DeHaven, and David Mellor, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS)] “Sometimes researchers use existing observations of nature to generate ideas about how the world…

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Replication: The Debate

On September 29, a public debate was held on the campus of NYU.  The subject of the debate was “Do Replication Projects Cast Doubt On Many Published Studies in Psychology?”  The debate pitted Brian Nosek, director of the Center for…

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MAREN DUVENDACK: What are Registered Replication Reports?

Academia has been abuzz in recent years with new initiatives focusing on research transparency, replication and reproducibility of research. Notable in this regard are the Berkeley Initiative for Transparency in the Social Sciences, and the Reproducibility Initiative which PLOS and…

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Getting the Publishers Into the Act

At a recent Wiley Executive Seminar, participants from the academic research and publishing community discussed how open science can reduce research bias.  Two trends are particularly noteworthy.  The first is that the TOP guidelines (Transparency and Openness Promotion) are gaining prominence….

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Is Most Published Research Wrong? The You Tube

This You Tube video, from the channel Veritasium, is a compendium of studies, anecdotes, and initiatives addressing key problems in scientific research.  It includes a compact summary of John Ioannides’ famous paper, “Why Most Published Research Findings Are False“, studies…

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Podcast on “The Replication Crisis”

On August 6th at a conference held at Berkeley (Effective Altruism Global 2016), four panellists discussed “The Replication Crisis”: Brian Nosek, Stuart Buck, Ivan Oransky, and Stephanie Wykstra (moderator = Julia Galef).  Some of the questions addressed were:  — Is failure…

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