Category: GUEST BLOGS


HOU, XUE, & ZHANG: Replication Controversies in Finance & Accounting

[NOTE: This entry is based on the article “Replicating Anomalies” (SSRN, updated in June 2017, https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2961979%5D Finance academics have started to take replication studies seriously. As hundreds of factors have been documented in recent decades, the concern over p-hacking has become…

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COFFMAN & WILSON: Assessing the Rate of Replications in Economics

In our AER Papers and Proceedings paper, “Assessing the Rate of Replications in Economics” we try to answer two questions. First, how often do economists attempt to replicate results? Second, how aware are we collectively of replication attempts that do…

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REED: Post-Hoc Power Analyses: Good for Nothing?

Observed power (or post-hoc power) is the statistical power of the test you have performed, based on the effect size estimate from your data. Statistical power is the probability of finding a statistical difference from 0 in your test (aka…

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LAKENS: Examining the Lack of a Meaningful Effect Using Equivalence Tests

When we perform a study, we would like to conclude there is an effect, when there is an effect. But it is just as important to be able to conclude there is no effect, when there is no effect. So…

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Economics E-Journal is Looking for a Few Good Replicators

The journal Economics: The Open Access, Open Assessment E-Journal is publishing a special issue on “The Practice of Replication.” This is how the journal describes it:  “The last several years have seen increased interest in replications in economics.  This was…

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HUBBARD: A Common-Sense Typology of Replications

[NOTE: This entry is based on the book “Corrupt Research: The Case for Reconceptualizing Empirical Management and Social Science” by Raymond Hubbard] Psychology’s “reproducibility crisis” (Open Science Collaboration, 2015) has drawn attention to the need for replication research. However, focusing…

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MENCLOVA: Is it Time for a Journal of Insignificant Results?

It is well known that there is a bias towards publication of statistically significant results. In fact, we have known this for at least 25 years since the publication of De Long and Lang (JPE 1992): “Economics articles are sprinkled…

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GELMAN: Some Natural Solutions to the p-Value Communication Problem—And Why They Won’t Work

[NOTE: This is a repost of a blog that Andrew Gelman wrote for the blogsite Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science]. Blake McShane and David Gal recently wrote two articles (“Blinding us to the obvious? The effect of statistical…

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CAMPBELL: On Perverse Incentives and Replication in Science

[NOTE: This is a repost of a blog that Doug Campbell wrote for his blogsite at douglaslcampbell.blogspot.co.nz] Stephen Hsu has a nice blog post on this topic. He writes about this common pattern: (1) Study reports results which reinforce the dominant,…

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ANDERSON & MAXWELL: There’s More than One Way to Conduct a Replication Study – Six, in Fact

NOTE: This entry is based on the article, “There’s More Than One Way to Conduct a Replication Study: Beyond Statistical Significance” (Psychological Methods, 2016, Vol, 21, No. 1, 1-12) Following a large-scale replication project in economics (Chang & Li, 2015)…

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