Category: GUEST BLOGS


GRUNOW: Say Hello to IREE – A New Economics Journal Dedicated to the Publishing of Replication Studies

Replications are pivotal for the credibility of empirical economics. Evidence-based policy requires findings that are robust and reproducible. Despite this, there has been a notable absence of serious effort to establish the reliability of empirical research in economics. As Edward…

Read More

GRUNOW: Notes from a Workshop: “Replications in Empirical Economics – Ways Out of the Crisis”

“Next year, this topic should not be discussed in a pre-conference workshop but in the opening plenum of the conference!” This statement by a young researcher not only concluded the workshop but also gave bright prospects to replications in Economics….

Read More

CHU, HENDERSON, AND WANG: US Food Aid — Good Intentions, Bad Outcomes

[NOTE: This post is based on the paper, “The Robust Relationship between US Food Aid and Civil Conflict”, Journal of Applied Econometrics, 2017] Replication can often be thought of as a useful tool to train graduate students or as a…

Read More

WEICHENRIEDER: FinanzArchiv/Public Finance Analysis Wants Your Insignificant Results!

There is considerable concern among scholars that empirical papers face a drastically smaller chance of being published if the results looking to confirm an established theory turn out to be statistically insignificant. Such a publication bias can provide a wrong…

Read More

BUTERA: A Novel Approach for Novel Results

[NOTE: This post refers to the article “An Economic Approach to Alleviate the Crises of Confidence in Science: With an Application to the Public Goods Game” by Luigi Butera and John List.  The article is available as a working paper…

Read More

ISO-AHOLA: On Reproducibility and Replication in Psychological and Economic Sciences

[This blog is a summary of a longer treatment of the subject that was published in Frontiers in Psychology in June 2017.  To read that article, click here.] Physicists have asked “why is there something rather than nothing?” They have theorized that…

Read More

SCHEEL: When Null Results Beat Significant Results OR Why Nothing May Be Truer Than Something

[The following is an adaption of (and in large parts identical to) a recent blog post by Anne Scheel that appeared on The 100% CI .] Many, probably most empirical scientists use frequentist statistics to decide if a hypothesis should be rejected…

Read More

HOU, XUE, & ZHANG: Replication Controversies in Finance & Accounting

[NOTE: This entry is based on the article “Replicating Anomalies” (SSRN, updated in June 2017, https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2961979%5D Finance academics have started to take replication studies seriously. As hundreds of factors have been documented in recent decades, the concern over p-hacking has become…

Read More

COFFMAN & WILSON: Assessing the Rate of Replications in Economics

In our AER Papers and Proceedings paper, “Assessing the Rate of Replications in Economics” we try to answer two questions. First, how often do economists attempt to replicate results? Second, how aware are we collectively of replication attempts that do…

Read More

REED: Post-Hoc Power Analyses: Good for Nothing?

Observed power (or post-hoc power) is the statistical power of the test you have performed, based on the effect size estimate from your data. Statistical power is the probability of finding a statistical difference from 0 in your test (aka…

Read More