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Redefining RSS

[From the blog “Justify Your Alpha by Decreasing Alpha Levels as a Function of the Sample Size” by Daniël Lakens, posted at The 20% Statistician] “Testing whether observed data should surprise us, under the assumption that some model of the data is…

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How do Psychologists Interpret Nonsignificant Results? Evidence from the Journals

[From the abstract to the article, “Quantifying Support for the Null Hypothesis in Psychology: An Empirical Investigation” by Aczel et al., recently published in Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science] “In the traditional statistical framework, nonsignificant results leave researchers…

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How to Get Something from Nothing. Or, “Yes, Virginia, You Can Do Ex-post Power Analyses”.

[From the article, “The effect of the conservation reserve program on rural economies: Deriving a statistical verdict from a null finding” by Jason Brown, Dayton Lambert, and Timothy Wojan, recently published in the American Journal of Agricultural Economics] “This article suggests…

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REED: Why Lowering Alpha to 0.005 is Unlikely to Help

[This blog is based on the paper, “A Primer on the ‘Reproducibility Crisis’ and Ways to Fix It” by the author] A standard research scenario is the following: A researcher is interested in knowing whether there is a relationship between…

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PARASURAMA: Why Overlapping Confidence Intervals Mean Nothing About Statistical Significance

[NOTE: This is a repost of a blog that Prasanna Parasurama published at the blogsite Towards Data Science]. “The confidence intervals of the two groups overlap, hence the difference is not statistically significant”  The statement above is wrong. Overlapping confidence…

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MCSHANE & GAL: Statistical Significance and Dichotomous Thinking Among Economists

[Note: This blog is based on our articles “Blinding Us to the Obvious? The Effect of Statistical Training on the Evaluation of Evidence” (Management Science, 2016) and “Statistical Significance and the Dichotomization of Evidence” (Journal of the American Statistical Association,…

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Abandon Statistical Significance?

[From the abstract of a recent working paper by Blakeley McShane, David Gal, Andrew Gelman, Christian Robert, and Jennifer Tackett.] “In science publishing and many areas of research, the status quo is a lexicographic decision rule in which any result is first  required to have…

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If At First You Don’t Succeed, Change Alpha

In a recent working paper, posted on PsyArXiv Preprints, Daniel Benjamin, James Berger, Magnus Johanneson, Brian Nosek, Eric-Jan Wagenmakers, and 67 other authors(!) argue for a stricter standard of statistical significance for studies claiming new discoveries.  In their words: “…we…

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SCHEEL: When Null Results Beat Significant Results OR Why Nothing May Be Truer Than Something

[The following is an adaption of (and in large parts identical to) a recent blog post by Anne Scheel that appeared on The 100% CI .] Many, probably most empirical scientists use frequentist statistics to decide if a hypothesis should be rejected…

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Reasons for Loving Null Results

In a great blog (“Why we should love null results”) posted at The 100% CI, Anne Scheel gives some reasons why we should love statistically insignificant findings. Her reasons include: — “We should love null results to counter our tendency…

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