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Predicting Reproducibility. No PhD Required.

[Excerpts taken from the article “Laypeople Can Predict Which Social Science Studies Replicate” by Suzanne Hoogeveen, Alexandra Sarafoglou, and Eric-Jan Wagenmakers, posted at PsyArXiv Preprints] “…we assess the extent to which a finding’s replication success relates to its intuitive plausibility….

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An Interview with Ted Miguel on “How To Do Open Science”

[Excerpts taken from the article “Ted Miguel in conversation on “Transparent and Reproducible Social Science Research: How to Do Open Science” by Isabelle Cohen and Hagit Caspi, posted at the website of the Economics Department, University of California, Berkeley] “Edward…

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Assessing the Peer Reviewers’ Openness (PRO) Initiative from the Perspective of PRO Signatories

[Excerpts taken from the preprint “’Because it is the Right Thing to Do’: Taking Stock of the Peer Reviewers’ Openness Initiative” by Maike Dahrendorf et al., posted at PsyArXiv Preprints] “Although the practice of publicly sharing data and code appears…

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Positive Findings are Drastically Lower in Registered Reports

[From slides prepared for the talk “Positive result rates in psychology: Registered Reports compared to the conventional literature” by Mitchell Schijen, Anne Scheel, and Daniël Lakens, presented at Open Science 2019 @ZPID, Trier , and posted at OSF] Conclusion: “Positive result rate in…

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BITSS to Offer Short Course on Research Transparency and Reproducibility Training in Washington DC, September 11-13, 2019

[From an announcement on the BITSS website] “Research Transparency and Reproducibility Training (RT2) provides participants with an overview of tools and best practices for transparent and reproducible social science research.”  “RT2 is designed for researchers in the social and health sciences,…

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GRUNOW: Update on IREE – the First and Only Journal Dedicated to Replications in Economics

IREE (the International Journal for Re-Views in Empirical Economics) was launched in September 2017, supported by our prestigious board of academic advisors: Sir Angus Deaton, Richard Easterlin, and Jeffrey Wooldridge. It is the first, and, to date, only journal solely…

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What Causes a Person to Become an “Open Science Convert”?

From the blog “Reflections of an open science convert. 1: Why I changed my research practices” (Part 1 of a 3-part series) by Ineke Wessel, posted at Mindwise] “Five years after Stapel’s fraud first became known, I came across Brian Wansink’s…

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Editor-in-Chief of Nature Wants Researchers to Make Their Data and Code Available

[From the article “Nature editor: researchers should be forced to make data public” by David Matthews, published at Times Higher Education] “The editor-in-chief of Nature has said that she would like to force researchers to make the data and code behind their…

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What Can Stop Bad Science? Open Science and Modified Funding Lotteries

[From the working paper, “Open science and modified funding lotteries can impede the natural selection of bad science” By Paul Smaldino, Matthew Turner, and Pablo Contreras Kallens, posted at OSF Preprints] “…we investigate the influence of three key factors on the…

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Changes in Open Science Practices Over Time in Economics, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology

[From a talk by Betsy Levy Paluck entitled “Open Science Practices are on the Rise Across Four Social Science Disciplines”, based on research with co-authors David Birke, Garret Christensen, Rebecca Littman, Ted Miguel, & Zenan Wang, presented at the annual meeting of BITSS]…

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