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Power Pose: The Glass is Half Full?

Recently, another sensational study from social psychology came under renewed criticism.  The study, “Power Posing: Brief Nonverbal Displays Affect Neuroendocrine Levels and Risk Tolerance” , published in Psychological Science in 2010 by Dana Carney, Amy Cuddy, and Andy Yap claimed that adopting…

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Why Are Replications Hot in Psychology But Not So Much in Economics?

In a recent blog at Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science, ANDREW GELMAN asks the question: “Why is so much of the discussion about psychology research? Why not economics, which is more controversial and gets more space in the news media? Or medicine,…

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Two More Findings from Psychology Fail to Replicate

[From the article, “A Worrying Trend for Psychology’s ‘Simple Little Tricks’” from The Atlantic magazine] “In yet another setback for the field, researchers have failed to replicate two studies showing that basic techniques can reduce racial achievement gaps and improve voter…

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Tales from the (Psychology) Crypt

This story about academic negligence, if not outright fraud, has many similarities with previous posts about “data mistakes,” though there is enough unique in the story to make it interesting in its own right.  To paraphrase Tolstoy, “each unhappy article…

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Progress Report on Open Science in Psychology

ETIENNE LEBEL, in a blog for BITSS, gives a brief but wide-ranging summary of the status of “open science” in psychology.  Topics include: (i) the use of “badges” to encourage provision of research materials, (ii) pre-registration, (iii) reproducibility, (iv) replications,…

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IN THE NEWS: The Economist (June 18, 2016)

[From the article “Come Again”]: “The GRIM test, short for granularity-related inconsistency of means, is a simple way of checking whether the results of small studies of the sort beloved of psychologists (those with fewer than 100 participants) could be…

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IN THE NEWS: NY Times (May 27, 2016)

In an article entitled “Why Do So Many Studies Fail to Replicate,” Jay Van Bavel, an associate professor of psychology at NYU, writes: “In a paper published on Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, my collaborators…

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Publication Bias in Action: The Case of Oxytocin and Trust

[From the article, “How scientists fell in and out of love with the hormone oxytocin” in Vox:Science & Health]  This article recounts how initial laboratory research showing the hormone oxytocin induced trust between people eventually was demonstrated to be mostly Type I error….

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So Is There a Replicability Crisis? Or What?

[From the blog Core Economics] Experimental economist ANDREAS ORTMANN reflects on the recent replicability studies in psychology and economics and tackles the question of what it all means.  The article is entitled, “So, is there a crisis?  Or is there…

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