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Registered Reports Are Not Optimal?

[From the working paper, “Which findings should be published?” by Alexander Frankel and Maximilian Kasy] “There have been calls for reforms in the direction of non-selective publication. One proposal is to promote statistical practices that de-emphasize statistical significance … Another…

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The AEA Interviews Ted Miguel About the Replication Crisis

[From the article “Making economics transparent and reproducible” by Tyler Smith, published on the American Economic Association’s website] “The AEA spoke with Miguel about the replication problem in economics and how the next generation of researchers is embracing new tools…

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More Pre-Registration, More Null Results

[From the article, “First analysis of ‘pre-registered’ studies shows sharp rise in null findings” by Matthew Warren, published at Nature.com] “Studies that fail to find a positive result are often filed away, never to see the light of day, which…

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How Many Biases? Let Us Count the Ways

[From the article “Congratulations. Your Study Went Nowhere” by Aaron Carroll, published at http://www.nytimes.com%5D “When we think of biases in research, the one that most often makes the news is a researcher’s financial conflict of interest. But another bias, one possibly even more…

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An Economist’s Journey Into the Replication Crisis

[From the blog “Why We Cannot Trust the Published Empirical Record in Economics and How to Make Things Better” by Sylvain Chabé-Ferret, posted at the blogsite An Economist’s Journey] “A strain of recent results is casting doubt on the soundness of the published empirical results in economics. Economics is…

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And How Are Things Going In Political Science?

[From the working paper “Why Too Many Political Science Findings Cannot be Trusted and What We Can Do About It” by Alexander Wuttke, posted at SocArXiv Papers] “…this article reviewed the meta-scientific evidence with a focus on the quantitative political science…

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DID, IV, RCT, and RDD: Which Method Is Most Prone to Selective Publication and p-Hacking?

[From the working paper, “Methods Matter: P-Hacking and Causal Inference in Economics” by Abel Brodeur, Nikolai Cook, and Anthony Heyes] “…Applying multiple methods to 13,440 hypothesis tests reported in 25 top economics journals in 2015, we show that selective publication and p-hacking is…

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Oh No! Not Zebra Finches Too!

[From the article, “Replication Failures Highlight Biases in Ecology and Evolution Science” by Yao-Hua Law, published at http://www.the-scientist.com%5D  “As robust efforts fail to reproduce findings of influential zebra finch studies from the 1980s, scientists discuss ways to reduce bias in such…

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Pre-Registration? Meet Publication Bias

[From the blog post, “What Is Preregistration For?” by Neuroskeptic, published at Discover Magazine] “The paper reports on five studies which all address the same general question. Of these, Study #3 was preregistered and the authors write that it was performed after…

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Progress in Publishing Negative Results?

[From the working paper, “Publication Bias and Editorial Statement on Negative Findings” by Cristina Blanco-Perez and Abel Brodeur] “In February 2015, the editors of eight health economics journals sent out an editorial statement which aims to reduce the incentives to…

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