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A Summary of Proposals to Improve Statistical Inference

In a recent comment published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, John Ioannidis provided the following summary of proposals (see table below). The summary, and his brief commentary, may be of interest to readers of TRN.  Source: Ioannidis…

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Replication Meets a Study About Attitudes Towards Gays: How Could There Not Be Controversy?

[From the article “Study that said hate cuts 12 years off gay lives fails to replicate”, posted at Retraction Watch] “A highly cited paper has received a major correction as a result of the ongoing battle over attitudes towards gay…

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IN THE NEWS: Wired (November 14, 2017)

[From the article “The Dismal Science Remains Dismal, Say Scientists” by Adam Rogers at wired.com] “WHEN HRISTOS DOUCOULIAGOS was a young economist in the mid-1990s, he got interested in all the ways economics was wrong about itself—bias, underpowered research, statistical shenanigans. Nobody wanted…

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IN THE NEWS: Vox (July 31, 2017)

[From the article “What a nerdy debate about p-values shows about science — and how to fix it” by Brian Resnick at Vox.com]  “There’s a huge debate going on in social science right now. The question is simple, and strikes…

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SCHEEL: When Null Results Beat Significant Results OR Why Nothing May Be Truer Than Something

[The following is an adaption of (and in large parts identical to) a recent blog post by Anne Scheel that appeared on The 100% CI .] Many, probably most empirical scientists use frequentist statistics to decide if a hypothesis should be rejected…

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Bayes Factors Versus p-Values

In a recent article in PLOS One, Don van Ravenzwaaij and John Ioannidis argue that Bayes factors should be preferred to significance testing (p-values) when assessing the effectiveness of new drugs.  At his blogsite The 20% Statistician, Daniel Lakens argues…

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Another Session on Reproducibility at the 2017 ASSA Meetings

TRN previously posted about two sessions on replication at the 2017 ASSA meetings. In what may be a sign of changing times, the American Economic Association is sponsoring a third session on this topic. The session, “Meta-Analysis and Reproducibility in…

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Is Most Published Research Wrong? The You Tube

This You Tube video, from the channel Veritasium, is a compendium of studies, anecdotes, and initiatives addressing key problems in scientific research.  It includes a compact summary of John Ioannides’ famous paper, “Why Most Published Research Findings Are False“, studies…

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A Brief History of Replication Efforts

FROM THE ARTICLE: “Worries about irreproducibility – when researchers find it impossible to reproduce the results of an experiment when it is rerun under the same conditions – came to the fore again last week when a landmark effort to…

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