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How Many Ways Are There to Replicate? The Journal Scientific Data Presents a Collection of Examples

[From the abstract of the article, “Replication data collection highlights value in diversity of replication attempts”, by DeSoto and Schweinsberg in the journal Scientific Data.]   “Researchers agree that replicability and reproducibility are key aspects of science. A collection of Data…

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The Peer Reviewers’ Openness Initiative (Part 1): Storm Brewing Within the American Psychological Association

[From the article “Peer-review activists push psychology journals towards open data” at nature.com]  “An editor on the board of a journal published by the prestigious American Psychological Association (APA) has been asked to resign in a controversy over data sharing…

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Peer Review Has Low Power: Act Surprised

[From the article “Peer review post-mortem: how a flawed aging study was published in Nature“, posted at the website, nrc.nl] “How could an article with numerous shortcomings be published in top-tier journal Nature?  Hester van Santen reveals how the gate-keepers of…

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What’s In a Name? When It Comes to “Reproducibility”, Apparently a Lot

[From the article “Muddled meanings hamper efforts to fix reproducibility crisis” in Nature]  “A semantic confusion is clouding one of the most talked-about issues in research. Scientists agree that there is a crisis in reproducibility, but they can’t agree on what ‘reproducibility’…

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Survey in Nature Reports on How Scientists View the “Reproducibility Crisis”

From the article “1500 Scientists lift the lid on reproducibility” published in Nature: “More than 70% of researchers have tried and failed to reproduce another scientist’s experiments, and more than half have failed to reproduce their own experiments. Those are some of…

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IN THE NEWS: Slate (April 15, 2016)

(FROM THE ARTICLE “The Reproducibility Crisis Is Good for Science”) The author, an editor at Nature, reports on ways the reproducibility crisis is promoting change in science. An excerpt: “For what it’s worth, articles about confirmation bias and the misuse of p-values…

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Can You Have Too Many Replications?

In a recent article in Nature, DALMEET SINGH CHAWLA asks “How Many Replication Studies Are Enough?” The article highlights the comments of psychologist Courtenay Norbury whose work on autism in children has apparently been replicated numerous times. So much so that another researcher…

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REPLICATE THIS: Do Dark-Skinned Footballers Get Given Red Cards More Often Than Light-Skinned Ones?

FROM THE ARTICLE: “It sounds like an easy question for any half-competent scientist to answer. Do dark-skinned footballers get given red cards more often than light-skinned ones? But, as RAPHAEL SILBERZAHN …and ERIC UHLMANN … illustrate in this week’s Nature, it…

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Could The Best Way to Find the Truth Be To Hide It?

In a recent opinion piece in the journal Nature, ROBERT MACCOUN and SAUL PERLMUTTER argue that “blind analysis” techniques, originally developed in particle physics, could be useful for the social sciences as well.  For example, in testing whether X affects…

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