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Battle of the p-Hackers: The HARKer Versus The Accumulator

[From the blog, “Gazing into the Abyss of P-Hacking: HARKing vs. Optional Stopping” by Angelika Stefan and Felix Schönbrodt, posted at Felix Schönbrodt’s website at http://www.nicebread.de%5D “Now, what does a researcher do when confronted with messy, non-significant results? According to several…

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An Economist’s Journey Into the Replication Crisis

[From the blog “Why We Cannot Trust the Published Empirical Record in Economics and How to Make Things Better” by Sylvain Chabé-Ferret, posted at the blogsite An Economist’s Journey] “A strain of recent results is casting doubt on the soundness of the published empirical results in economics. Economics is…

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Things Aren’t Looking That Great in Ecology and Evolution Either

[From a recent working paper entitled “Questionable Research Practices in Ecology and Evolution” by Hannah Fraser, Tim Parker, Shinichi Nakagawa, Ashley Barnett, and Fiona Fidler] “We surveyed 807 researchers (494 ecologists and 313 evolutionary biologists) about their use of Questionable…

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MURPHY: Quantifying the Role of Research Misconduct in the Failure to Replicate

[NOTE: This blog is based on the article “HARKing: How Badly Can Cherry-Picking and Question Trolling Produce Bias in Published Results?” by Kevin Murphy and Herman Aguinis, recently published in the Journal of Business and Psychology.] The track record for…

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HARKing is Bad, But Which Kind of HARKing is Worse?

[From the article “HARKing: How Badly Can Cherry-Picking and Question Trolling Produce Bias in Published Results?” by Kevin Murphy and Herman Aguinis, published in the Journal of Business and Psychology.]  “The practice of hypothesizing after results are known (HARKing) has…

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