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To Your List of Biases in Meta-Analyses, Add This One: Accumulation Bias

[From the preprint “Accumulation bias in meta-analysis: the need to consider time in error control” by Judith ter Schure and Peter Grünwald, posted at arXiv.org] “Studies accumulate over time and meta-analyses are mainly retrospective. These two characteristics introduce dependencies between…

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Do You Use Clustered Standard Errors? You Should Read This

[From the working paper, “How Cluster-Robust Inference Is Changing Applied Econometrics” by James MacKinnon, posted as a Queen’s University Working Paper] “Whenever the observations can plausibly be grouped into a set of clusters, it has become customary, indeed often mandatory,…

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What If There Isn’t a Single Effect Size? Implications for Power Calculations, Hypothesis Testing, Confidence Intervals and Replications

[From the working paper “The Unappreciated Heterogeneity of Effect Sizes:Implications for Power, Precision, Planning of Research, and Replication” by David Kenny and Charles Judd, posted at Open Science Framework (OSF)] “The goal of this article is to examine the implications…

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An Interesting Thread on Pre-registration

The Psychonomic Society has been hosting an interesting blog series on pre-registration. Below are the five blogs with ridiculously brief, and probably misleading, summaries: Stephen Lindsay (“Arguments for Preregistering Psychology Research”) SUMMARY: Proper interpretation of the results from hypothesis testing…

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All Roads Lead to Rome?

[From the working paper, “Multiple Perspectives on Inference for Two Simple Statistical Scenarios” by van Dongen et al., posted at PsyArXiv Preprints] “When analyzing a specific data set, statisticians usually operate within the confines of their preferred inferential paradigm. For…

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Battle of the p-Hackers: The HARKer Versus The Accumulator

[From the blog, “Gazing into the Abyss of P-Hacking: HARKing vs. Optional Stopping” by Angelika Stefan and Felix Schönbrodt, posted at Felix Schönbrodt’s website at http://www.nicebread.de%5D “Now, what does a researcher do when confronted with messy, non-significant results? According to several…

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BROWN, LAMBERT, & WOJAN: At the Intersection of Null Findings and Replication

Replication is an important topic in economic research or any social science for that matter. This issue is most important when an analysis is undertaken to inform decisions by policymakers. Drawing inferences from null or insignificant finding is particularly problematic…

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