Category: GUEST BLOGS


RANDALL & WELSER: On the Irreproducibility Crisis of Modern Science

[This post is based on the report,  “The Irreproducibility Crisis of Modern Science: Causes, Consequences and the Road to Reform”, recently published by the National Association of Scholars] For more than a decade, and especially since the publication of a…

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ROYNE: Building and Enhancing the Advertising Discipline Through Replication

[This blog is taken from a recent editorial that appeared in the Journal of Advertising Research entitled “Why We Need More Replication Studies to Keep Empirical Knowledge in Check” by Marla B. Royne. The full-length editorial can be found here]…

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VALLOIS & JULLIEN: Is Experimental Economics Really Doing Better? The Case of Public Goods Experiments

[From the working paper, “Replication in experimental economics: A historical and quantitative approach focused on public good game experiments” by Nicolas Vallois and Dorian Jullien] The current “replication crisis” concerns the inability of scientists to “replicate”, i.e. to reproduce a great…

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MCMILLAN: Cogent Economics & Finance is Now Publishing Replications

As of the start of 2018, the journal Cogent Economics and Finance is introducing a replication section. Cogent Economics and Finance is an open access journal publishing high-quality, peer-reviewed research. It is indexed in Scopus, Web of Science’s Emerging Sources…

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COVILLE & VIVALT: Should We Trust Evidence On Development Programs?

[From the working paper, “How Often Should We Believe Positive Results? Assessing the Credibility of Research Findings in Development Economics” by Aidan Coville and Eva Vivalt] Over $140 billion is spent on donor assistance to developing countries annually to promote…

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BLANCO-PEREZ & BRODEUR: Progress in Publishing Negative Results?

[From the working paper, “Publication Bias and Editorial Statement on Negative Findings” by Cristina Blanco-Perez and Abel Brodeur] Prior research points out that there is a selection bias in favor of positive results by editors and referees. In other words,…

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REED: The Replication Crisis – A Single Replication Can Make a Big Difference

[This post is based on the paper, “A Primer on the ‘Reproducibility Crisis’ and Ways to Fix It” by the author] In a previous post, I argued that lowering α from 0.05 to 0.005, as advocated by Benjamin et al….

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MURPHY: Quantifying the Role of Research Misconduct in the Failure to Replicate

[NOTE: This blog is based on the article “HARKing: How Badly Can Cherry-Picking and Question Trolling Produce Bias in Published Results?” by Kevin Murphy and Herman Aguinis, recently published in the Journal of Business and Psychology.] The track record for…

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LEBEL: Curate Science – 2017 Year in Review and Upcoming Plans for 2018

Curate Science (CurateScience.org) is an online platform to track, organize, and interpret replications of published findings in the social sciences, with a current focus on the psychology literature. We had a very productive year in 2017. Here are some highlights…

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REED: Why Lowering Alpha to 0.005 is Unlikely to Help

[This blog is based on the paper, “A Primer on the ‘Reproducibility Crisis’ and Ways to Fix It” by the author] A standard research scenario is the following: A researcher is interested in knowing whether there is a relationship between…

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