Category: GUEST BLOGS


MCMILLAN: Cogent Economics & Finance is Now Publishing Replications

As of the start of 2018, the journal Cogent Economics and Finance is introducing a replication section. Cogent Economics and Finance is an open access journal publishing high-quality, peer-reviewed research. It is indexed in Scopus, Web of Science’s Emerging Sources…

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COVILLE & VIVALT: Should We Trust Evidence On Development Programs?

[From the working paper, “How Often Should We Believe Positive Results? Assessing the Credibility of Research Findings in Development Economics” by Aidan Coville and Eva Vivalt] Over $140 billion is spent on donor assistance to developing countries annually to promote…

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BLANCO-PEREZ & BRODEUR: Progress in Publishing Negative Results?

[From the working paper, “Publication Bias and Editorial Statement on Negative Findings” by Cristina Blanco-Perez and Abel Brodeur] Prior research points out that there is a selection bias in favor of positive results by editors and referees. In other words,…

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REED: The Replication Crisis – A Single Replication Can Make a Big Difference

[This post is based on the paper, “A Primer on the ‘Reproducibility Crisis’ and Ways to Fix It” by the author] In a previous post, I argued that lowering α from 0.05 to 0.005, as advocated by Benjamin et al….

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MURPHY: Quantifying the Role of Research Misconduct in the Failure to Replicate

[NOTE: This blog is based on the article “HARKing: How Badly Can Cherry-Picking and Question Trolling Produce Bias in Published Results?” by Kevin Murphy and Herman Aguinis, recently published in the Journal of Business and Psychology.] The track record for…

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LEBEL: Curate Science – 2017 Year in Review and Upcoming Plans for 2018

Curate Science (CurateScience.org) is an online platform to track, organize, and interpret replications of published findings in the social sciences, with a current focus on the psychology literature. We had a very productive year in 2017. Here are some highlights…

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REED: Why Lowering Alpha to 0.005 is Unlikely to Help

[This blog is based on the paper, “A Primer on the ‘Reproducibility Crisis’ and Ways to Fix It” by the author] A standard research scenario is the following: A researcher is interested in knowing whether there is a relationship between…

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REED: An Open Invitation to Give Your Perspective on “The Practice of Replication”

In September of this year, the journal Economics: The Open Access, Open Assessment E-Journal published a series of Discussion Papers for a special issue on “The Practice of Replication”. The motivation behind the special issue came from the following two…

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PARASURAMA: Why Overlapping Confidence Intervals Mean Nothing About Statistical Significance

[NOTE: This is a repost of a blog that Prasanna Parasurama published at the blogsite Towards Data Science]. “The confidence intervals of the two groups overlap, hence the difference is not statistically significant”  The statement above is wrong. Overlapping confidence…

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MCSHANE & GAL: Statistical Significance and Dichotomous Thinking Among Economists

[Note: This blog is based on our articles “Blinding Us to the Obvious? The Effect of Statistical Training on the Evaluation of Evidence” (Management Science, 2016) and “Statistical Significance and the Dichotomization of Evidence” (Journal of the American Statistical Association,…

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