Category: NEWS & EVENTS


But Not as Good as Psychologists?

The website FiveThirtyEight has a thoughtful post reflecting on the recent study in psychology in which 100 experimental studies were replicated . At least two points are worth highlighting.  First, despite the concern about p-hacking, it turns out that one…

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We Have Met the Enemy, and He is Us

FROM THE ARTICLE: “We studied publication bias in the social sciences by analyzing a known population of conducted studies—221 in total—in which there is a full accounting of what is published and unpublished. … Strong results are 40 percentage points more…

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Results from a Massive Study on Replication of Psychology Research

FROM THE ARTICLE: “We conducted replications of 100 experimental and correlational studies published in three psychology journals using high-powered designs and original materials when available. Replication effects were half the magnitude of original effects, representing a substantial decline. Ninety-seven percent…

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At Least We’re Better Than Sociologists?

In a recent blog on orgtheory.net, Cristobal Young reports: “We conducted a small field experiment as part of a graduate course in statistical analysis. Students selected sociological articles that they admired and wanted to learn from, and asked the authors…

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Berkeley Initiative for Transparency in the Social Sciences (BITSS) Announces Large Cash Prizes

BITSS announces the Leamer-Rosenthal Prizes for Open Social Science.  There are two prize groups.  The first is for young researchers who either evidence transparency in their own research or have researched on the subject of transparency.  The second group is…

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On p-Hacking, Retractions, and the Difficult Enterprise of Science

This article in FiveThirtyEighty.com is a great read for lots of reasons.  The leitmotiv is that while science has its share of fraudsters and academic scammers, the underlying problem is that the scientific enterprise is inherently very, very difficult.  To…

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Headline News: Two Economists Make Their Data Available

FROM THE ARTICLE: “Every year hundreds of millions of children in the developing world are given deworming tablets, whether they have worms or not….This “deworm everybody” approach has been driven by a single, hugely influential trial published in 2004 by…

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It’s So Easy to Do: Small Coding Error Leads to Retraction

This article from the Washington Post is noteworthy only because it highlights how a small coding error can cause a major change in a study’s results.  The original study claimed that men were more likely than women to divorce a…

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What’s In a Name? Economist Argues for A Better Definition of Replication

In his post at The Impact Blog, economist Michael Clemens argues that vagueness about what constitutes a replication is harming the reputations of reputable researchers, and hurting the progress of replications.  Clemens proposes a classification system to eliminate confusion between…

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Retraction Watch Publishes a “Leaderboard” of Top Retractors

The website Retraction Watch is approaching it’s 5th birthday.  Among other things, it publishes a “leaderboard” where they keep track of researchers with the most retractions. The leaderboard lists a Top 30 list of researchers, with links to the individual cases….

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