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StudySwap: eHarmony for Replicators

[From an interview with Christopher Chartier and Randy McCarthy at Retraction Watch]   “Do researchers need a new “Craigslist?” We were recently alerted to a new online platform called StudySwap by one of its creators … The platform creates an “online marketplace” that previous researchers…

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“Rigor Mortis”: The Retraction Watch Interview with Richard Harris

Reproducibility is not just an issue in economics.  In a new book, “Rigor Mortis: How Sloppy Science Creates Worthless Cures, Crushes Hope, and Wastes Billions”, NPR science reporter Richard Harris describes and elaborates on the problem of irreproducibility for medical…

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COUPÉ: Are Replications Worth it?

Does it make sense for an academic to put effort in replicating another study? While reading a paper in Political Analysis (Katz, 2001[1]) in 2005, I noticed a strange thing. In that paper, the author uses simulations to check how…

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BOB REED: Replications and Peer Review

“Weekend Reads”, the weekly summary by IVAN ORANSKY of Retraction Watch, recently listed two articles on Peer Review.  One, a blog by George Borjas, concerns the recent imbroglio at the American Economic Review involving an editor who oversaw the review of…

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Journal Finds that Digital Badges Increase Data Sharing

[From the Retraction Watch website] “In January 2014, Psychological Science began rewarding digital badges to authors who committed to open science practices such as sharing data and materials. A study published today in PLOS Biology looks at whether publicizing such behavior helps encourage others to…

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BOB REED: Replications Can Make Things Worse? Really?

In a recent article in Slate entitled “The Unintended Consequences of Trying to Replicate Research,” IVAN ORANSKY and ADAM MARCUS from Retraction Watch argue that replications can exacerbate research unreliability.  The argument assumes that publication bias is more likely to favour confirming replication studies…

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Can You Teach Research Integrity? Sure, But That Doesn’t Mean They’ll Learn

[From the article in Retraction Watch] “Can we teach good behavior in the lab? That’s the premise behind a number of interventions aimed at improving research integrity, invested in by universities across the world and even private companies. Trouble is, a new…

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On the Reproducibility of Psychological Science: A Response from Nosek and Gilbert

[From an article in Retraction Watch] “Scientists have been abuzz over a report in last week’s Science questioning the results of a recent landmark effort to replicate 100 published studies in top psychology journals. The critique of this effort – which suggested…

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The American Statistical Association Wants to Change the Way We Use p-values

[From an article at Retraction Watch] “After reading too many papers that either are not reproducible or contain statistical errors (or both), the American Statistical Association (ASA) has been roused to action. Today the group released six principles for the use…

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REBLOG: The Reformation: Can Social Scientists Save Themselves?

We recently came across this article in the May/June 2014 issue of Pacific Standard magazine.  Okay.  It’s not “new”, but it provides an excellent historical overview of some of the issues associated with reproducibility of social science research.  WARNING: It…

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