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KARABAG & BERGGREN: Misconduct and Marginality in Management, Business, and Economics Journals

The problems of publication misconduct – manipulation, fabrication and plagiarism – and other dodgy practices such as salami-style publications are attracting increasing attention.  In the newly published paper “Misconduct, Marginality, and Editorial Practices in Management, Business, and Economics” (full text…

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Tales from the (Psychology) Crypt

This story about academic negligence, if not outright fraud, has many similarities with previous posts about “data mistakes,” though there is enough unique in the story to make it interesting in its own right.  To paraphrase Tolstoy, “each unhappy article…

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BOB REED: On Andrew Gelman, Retractions, and the Supply and Demand for Data Transparency

In a recent interview on Retraction Watch, Andrew Gelman reveals that what keeps him up at night isn’t scientific fraud, it’s “the sheer number of unreliable studies — uncorrected, unretracted — that have littered the literature.”  He then goes on…

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On p-Hacking, Retractions, and the Difficult Enterprise of Science

This article in FiveThirtyEighty.com is a great read for lots of reasons.  The leitmotiv is that while science has its share of fraudsters and academic scammers, the underlying problem is that the scientific enterprise is inherently very, very difficult.  To…

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It’s So Easy to Do: Small Coding Error Leads to Retraction

This article from the Washington Post is noteworthy only because it highlights how a small coding error can cause a major change in a study’s results.  The original study claimed that men were more likely than women to divorce a…

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Retraction Watch Publishes a “Leaderboard” of Top Retractors

The website Retraction Watch is approaching it’s 5th birthday.  Among other things, it publishes a “leaderboard” where they keep track of researchers with the most retractions. The leaderboard lists a Top 30 list of researchers, with links to the individual cases….

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Blogsite “Political Science Replication” summarizes the LaCour faked data scandal

The blogsite Political Science Replication summarizes the recent “scandal” in which a graduate student at UCLA (Michael LaCour) is accused of fabricating data for an article published in Science magazine, leading to its retraction.  The summary includes a description of…

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Retractions and faked data

FROM THE ARTICLE: “A political scientist on Tuesday said he was retracting a paper he’d co-authored — one with wide influence on how campaigns can change public opinion — when faced with evidence that the paper’s central finding was based…

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