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This Crazy Academic World: Papers that Criticize the Hawthorne Effect Contribute To Affirmative Citations

[Excerpts are taken from the article “Affirmative citation bias in scientific myth debunking: A three-in-one case study” by Kåre Letrud and Sigbjørn Hernes, published in PLOS One] “…we perform case studies of the academic reception of three articles critical of…

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The Private and Public Benefits of Posting Data and Code

[From the blog “Why researchers should publish their data” by Karl Rubio, posted at http://www.povertyactionlab.org%5D “There has been a growing research transparency movement within the social sciences to encourage broader data publication. In this blog post we share some background…

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Original Study Finds A Result. Follow-up Studies Fail to Replicate It. The Record is Corrected. Right?

[From the post “A study fails to replicate, but it continues to get referenced as if it had no problems. Communication channels are blocked.” by Andrew Gelman at Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science] “In 2005, Michael Kosfeld, Markus Heinrichs,…

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18,000 Retractions?

[From the video, “The Retraction Watch Database” by Ivan Oransky, posted at YouTube]. Ivan Oransky, MD, co-founder of the website Retraction Watch gave a talk at the Joint Roadmap for Open Science Tools Workshop at Berkeley in August. In this…

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Is the R-Factor the Answer?

In a recent working paper (“Science with no fiction: measuring the veracity of  scientific reports by citation analysis”), Peter Grabitz, Yuri Lazebnik,  Josh Nicholson, and Sean Rife suggest that one solution to the “crisis” in scientific credibility is publication of an article’s…

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Is Most Economics Research Never Cited?

In a recent blog post in the LA Times entitled “Are most academic papers really worthless? Don’t trust this worthless statistic”, MICHAEL HILTZIK counters the widely held belief that most research is never cited.  To read, click here.   So just…

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