Archives


GOODMAN: Your p-Values Are Too Small! And So Are Your Confidence Intervals!

An oft-overlooked detail in the significance debate is the challenge of calculating correct p-values and confidence intervals, the favored statistics of the two sides. Standard methods rely on assumptions about how the data were generated and can be way off…

Read More

Do Not Abandon Statistical Significance

[From the article “The Importance of Predefined Rules and Prespecified Statistical Analyses: Do Not Abandon Significance” by John Ioannidis, published in JAMA] “A recent proposal to ban statistical significance gained campaign-level momentum in a commentary with 854 recruited signatories. The…

Read More

How Many Ways Can You Misinterpret p-Values, Confidence Intervals, Statistical Tests, and Power? 25

[From the blog “Misinterpreting Tests, P-Values, Confidence Intervals & Power” by Dave Giles, posted at his blogsite, Econometrics Beat] “Today I was reading a great paper by Greenland et al. (2016) that deals with some common misconceptions and misinterpretations that arise not…

Read More

What If There Isn’t a Single Effect Size? Implications for Power Calculations, Hypothesis Testing, Confidence Intervals and Replications

[From the working paper “The Unappreciated Heterogeneity of Effect Sizes:Implications for Power, Precision, Planning of Research, and Replication” by David Kenny and Charles Judd, posted at Open Science Framework (OSF)] “The goal of this article is to examine the implications…

Read More

Intro to Open Science in 8 Easy Steps

[From the working paper, “8 Easy Steps to Open Science: An Annotated Reading List” by Sophia Crüwell et al., posted at PsyArXiv Preprints] “In this paper, we provide a comprehensive and concise introduction to open science practices and resources that can help…

Read More

GELMAN: Some Natural Solutions to the p-Value Communication Problem—And Why They Won’t Work

[NOTE: This is a repost of a blog that Andrew Gelman wrote for the blogsite Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science]. Blake McShane and David Gal recently wrote two articles (“Blinding us to the obvious? The effect of statistical…

Read More

ANDERSON & MAXWELL: There’s More than One Way to Conduct a Replication Study – Six, in Fact

NOTE: This entry is based on the article, “There’s More Than One Way to Conduct a Replication Study: Beyond Statistical Significance” (Psychological Methods, 2016, Vol, 21, No. 1, 1-12) Following a large-scale replication project in economics (Chang & Li, 2015)…

Read More