Category: NEWS & EVENTS


Netherlands Spending 3 Million Euros to Fund Replications

[From the website of the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO)] :”NWO is making 3 million euros available for a Replication Studies pilot programme. In this programme, scientists will be able to repeat research that has been carried out by others….

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3ie Wants You To Do a Replication for Them — And They’re Willing to Pay

[From 3ie — International Initiative for Impact Evaluation]: “3ie requests expressions of interest from researchers interested in conducting replication studies under 3ie’s Replication Window 4: Financial Services for the Poor…Funding is available to conduct internal replications of seven highly influential…

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Tales from the (Psychology) Crypt

This story about academic negligence, if not outright fraud, has many similarities with previous posts about “data mistakes,” though there is enough unique in the story to make it interesting in its own right.  To paraphrase Tolstoy, “each unhappy article…

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PPT Slides for Garret Christensen’s Presentation on Research Transparency in Economics

Recently, GARRET CHRISTENSEN, project scientist at BITSS, reviewed the literature on  research transparency at a talk given at the Western Economic Association meetings.  You can access his slides here.

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Tales from the (Economics) Crypt

Recently, ANDREW GELMAN blogged about a communication he received from Per Pettersson-Lidbom, an economist at Stockholm University. Petterson shared three stories of “scientific fraud” in papers published in top economics journals.  Gelman writes, “… I’m sharing Pettersson’s stories, neither endorsing nor disputing their particulars but…

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Progress Report on Open Science in Psychology

ETIENNE LEBEL, in a blog for BITSS, gives a brief but wide-ranging summary of the status of “open science” in psychology.  Topics include: (i) the use of “badges” to encourage provision of research materials, (ii) pre-registration, (iii) reproducibility, (iv) replications,…

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IN THE NEWS: The Economist (June 18, 2016)

[From the article “Come Again”]: “The GRIM test, short for granularity-related inconsistency of means, is a simple way of checking whether the results of small studies of the sort beloved of psychologists (those with fewer than 100 participants) could be…

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Don’t Have Time To Do a Replication? Have You Considered p-Curves?

So another study finds that X affects Y, and you are a sufficiently cynical TRN reader that you wonder if the authors have p-hacked their way to get their result.  Don’t have time (or the incentive) to do a replication?  You…

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What’s In a Name? When It Comes to “Reproducibility”, Apparently a Lot

[From the article “Muddled meanings hamper efforts to fix reproducibility crisis” in Nature]  “A semantic confusion is clouding one of the most talked-about issues in research. Scientists agree that there is a crisis in reproducibility, but they can’t agree on what ‘reproducibility’…

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NPR Podcast on What It Means When Replications Fail

[From the podcast “When Great Minds Think Unlike: Inside Science’s ‘Replication Crisis” from NPR’s Hidden Brain series]  This podcast is distinguished by its discussion of what it means – and what it doesn’t mean – when a replication “fails.”  It…

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