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Have Registered Reports Uncovered Massive Publication Bias? Evidence from Psychology

[Excerpts taken from the preprint, “An excess of positive results: Comparing the standard Psychology literature with Registered Reports” by Anne Scheel, Mitchell Schijen, and Daniël Lakens, posted at PsyArXiv] “Registered Reports (RRs) are a new publication format…Before collecting data, authors…

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The Main Reason to Pre-Register Your Research Is…

[Excerpts taken from the article, “The Value of Preregistration for Psychological Science: A Conceptual Analysis”, by Daniël Lakens, posted at PsyArXiv Preprints] “With the rise of the internet it has become feasible to create online registries that ask researchers to…

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Reproducibility and Meta-Analyses: Two Great Concepts That Apparently Don’t Mix

[Excerpts taken from the report “Examining the Reproducibility of Meta-Analyses in Psychology: A Preliminary Report” by Daniel Lakens et al., posted at MetaArXiv Preprints ] “…given the broad array of problems that make it difficult to evaluate the evidential value…

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Positive Findings are Drastically Lower in Registered Reports

[From slides prepared for the talk “Positive result rates in psychology: Registered Reports compared to the conventional literature” by Mitchell Schijen, Anne Scheel, and Daniël Lakens, presented at Open Science 2019 @ZPID, Trier , and posted at OSF] Conclusion: “Positive result rate in…

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Don’t Abandon It! Learn (and Teach) to Use It Correctly

[From the paper “The practical alternative to the p-value is the correctly used p-value” by Daniël Lakens, posted at PsyArXiv Preprints] “I do not think it is useful to tell researchers what they want to know. Instead, we should teach…

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IN THE NEWS: Undark (March 21, 2019)

[From the article “Stats Experts Plead: Just Say No to P-Hacking” by Dalmeet Singh Chawla, published in Undark] “For decades, researchers have used a statistical measure called the p-value — a widely-debated statistic that even scientists find difficult to define — that is…

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Somebody Asks, How Can A Theory Be Falsified? Twitter Responds

[From the Twitter thread started by @JessieSunPsych] Jessie Sun (@JessieSunPsych) relayed the following question that was raised at a recent Psychology conference: “At what point can a theory be falsified (e.g., if the effect size is d = .02)? We often…

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Redefining RSS

[From the blog “Justify Your Alpha by Decreasing Alpha Levels as a Function of the Sample Size” by Daniël Lakens, posted at The 20% Statistician] “Testing whether observed data should surprise us, under the assumption that some model of the data is…

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Should Science Do More Replications? It Depends

[From the recent working paper, “The Costs and Benefits of Replication Studies” by Coles, Tiokhin, Scheel, Isager, and Lakens, posted at psyarxiv.com/c8akj] “The debate about whether replication studies should become mainstream is essentially driven by disagreements about their costs and benefits,…

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A Roundtable Podcast on the Merits of Lowering the Threshold for Statistical Significance to 0.005

This past week, the International Methods Colloquium hosted a conference call on a recent proposal to reduce the threshold of statistical significance to 0.005.  Participants included Daniel Benjamin, Daniel Lakens, Blake McShane, Jennifer Tackett, E.J. Wagenmakers,  and Justin Esarey, all…

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