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What Can Meta-Analyses Tell Us About Reproducibility?

[From the abstract of the article “What Meta-Analyses Reveal About the Replicability of Psychological Research” by T.D. Stanley, Evan Carter, and Hristos Doucouliagos, published in Psychological Bulletin] “Can recent failures to replicate psychological research be explained by typical magnitudes of statistical power,bias…

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HIRSCHAUER et al.: Why replication is a nonsense exercise if we stick to dichotomous significance thinking and neglect the p-value’s sample-to-sample variability

[This blog is based on the paper “Pitfalls of significance testing and p-value variability: An econometrics perspective” by Norbert Hirschauer, Sven Grüner, Oliver Mußhoff, and Claudia Becker, Statistics Surveys 12(2018): 136-172.] Replication studies are often regarded as the means to…

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How to Get Something from Nothing. Or, “Yes, Virginia, You Can Do Ex-post Power Analyses”.

[From the article, “The effect of the conservation reserve program on rural economies: Deriving a statistical verdict from a null finding” by Jason Brown, Dayton Lambert, and Timothy Wojan, recently published in the American Journal of Agricultural Economics] “This article suggests…

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The Truth is Out There. It’s Just Not Very Likely.

[From the paper, “Perceived Crisis and Reforms: Issues, Explanations, and Remedies”, authored by Paul De Boeck and Minjeong Jeon, published in the July issue of Psychological Bulletin] “…we believe that the OSC [Open Science Collaboration] study allows us to obtain…

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COVILLE & VIVALT: Should We Trust Evidence On Development Programs?

[From the working paper, “How Often Should We Believe Positive Results? Assessing the Credibility of Research Findings in Development Economics” by Aidan Coville and Eva Vivalt] Over $140 billion is spent on donor assistance to developing countries annually to promote…

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REED: Post-Hoc Power Analyses: Good for Nothing?

Observed power (or post-hoc power) is the statistical power of the test you have performed, based on the effect size estimate from your data. Statistical power is the probability of finding a statistical difference from 0 in your test (aka…

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