Category: GUEST BLOGS


KARABAG & BERGGREN: Misconduct and Marginality in Management, Business, and Economics Journals

The problems of publication misconduct – manipulation, fabrication and plagiarism – and other dodgy practices such as salami-style publications are attracting increasing attention.  In the newly published paper “Misconduct, Marginality, and Editorial Practices in Management, Business, and Economics” (full text…

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FINDLEY, JENSEN, MALESKY, & PEPINSKY: Nothing Up with Acai Berries: Some Reflections On Null Results from a Results-Free Peer Review Process

In the academy and well beyond, the problem of null results has become quite significant. Indeed, discussions of null results have made their way as far as TV commentator John Oliver’s recent discussion of science in which he poignantly notes…

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MAREN DUVENDACK: What are Registered Replication Reports?

Academia has been abuzz in recent years with new initiatives focusing on research transparency, replication and reproducibility of research. Notable in this regard are the Berkeley Initiative for Transparency in the Social Sciences, and the Reproducibility Initiative which PLOS and…

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BYINGTON & FELPS: On Resolving the Social Dilemmas that Lead to Non-Credible Science

In our forthcoming article “Solutions to the credibility crisis in Management science” (full text available here), we suggest that “social dilemmas” in the production of Management science put scholars and journal gatekeepers in a difficult position – pitting self-interest against…

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LAMPACH & MORAWETZ: A Primer on How to Replicate Propensity Score Matching Studies

Propensity Score Matching (PSM) approaches have become increasingly popular in empirical economics. These methods are intuitively appealing.  PSM procedures are available in well-known software packages such as R or Stata. The fundamental idea behind PSM is that treated observations are…

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BOB REED: Replications and Peer Review

“Weekend Reads”, the weekly summary by IVAN ORANSKY of Retraction Watch, recently listed two articles on Peer Review.  One, a blog by George Borjas, concerns the recent imbroglio at the American Economic Review involving an editor who oversaw the review of…

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BOB REED: The Problem With Open Data: Would Requiring Co-Authorship Help?

There has been a huge amount of attention focused on “open data.”  A casual reading of the blogosphere is that Open Data is good, Secret Data is bad.   Remarkably, there has been very little discussion given to the property right…

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BOB REED: On Andrew Gelman, Retractions, and the Supply and Demand for Data Transparency

In a recent interview on Retraction Watch, Andrew Gelman reveals that what keeps him up at night isn’t scientific fraud, it’s “the sheer number of unreliable studies — uncorrected, unretracted — that have littered the literature.”  He then goes on…

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STEPHANIE WYKSTRA: On Data Re-use

[THIS BLOG ORIGINALLY APPEARED ON THE BITSS WEBSITE]  As advocates for open data, my colleagues and I often point to re-use of data for further research as a major benefit of data-sharing. In fact there are many cases in which…

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ROBERT GELFOND and RYAN MURPHY: Out-of-Sample Tests and Macroeconomics

The replication crisis has elicited a number of recommendations, from betting on beliefs, to open data, to improved norms in academic journals regarding replication studies. In our recent working paper, “A Call for Out-of-Sample Testing in Macroeconomics” (available at SSRN),…

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